HBO’s “Girls”: the voice of a generation? No…but that’s ok.

“I think that I may be the voice of my generation,” Hannah says to her parents: “Or at least a voice. Of a generation.” Lena Dunham, the creator and writer of the freshly started HBO series plays the role of Hannah Horvath, an aspiring writer who is dealing with what feels like a never-ending transition into adulthood. It’s that strange period when one is not quite an adult but no longer a teenager. Some have perceived the series’ portrayal of American female youth as another post-graduate and whiny coming of age tale and even though it may feel like it at times, the series itself contains a level of originality, imaginative and sophistication often missed in most Hollywood portrayals of young Americans today. It’s not the anti-Sex in the City but the series functions in a very similar way: a group of friends who constantly deal with each others personal problems while at the same time shaping each other as women. The characters are well developed and they all feel strangely familiar, you’ve probably met the kind before in a party somewhere in Williamsburg or in some gallery opening in Chelsea. The reason it feels strange it’s because these kind of characters are rarely portrayed on screen. The fact that the show is written and directed by someone like Lena Dunham who invests her own experiences into the show, gives it a fresh new personality. The absurdity of problems and the dramatic impulsive spontaneity of situations give the series a comedic touch that sometimes even echoes a Woody Allanesque style that can only belong in New York City. The topic of sex is recurring in the show and it is often caricatured into the extreme making it embarrassingly funny. Visually, the show has a particularly interesting style. The colorful yet minimalist aesthetics of the show have already been established in Dunham’s last critically acclaimed feature “Tiny Furniture”. In fact, most of the characters are all based on the same ones from the film. Lena Dunham has already proven herself as an auteur and has even stirred debate in the web on her new show on HBO. All of this at the age of 26. Perhaps she is not the voice of our generation…but that’s alright, it looks like we’ll defiantly be seeing more of her in the future, possibly even at the 2012 Emmys, but who knows? After one season successfully finished, I believe Dunham’s best work is yet to come.

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